Voting Rights in Alaska

Last month, this country marked the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which granted women across the nation the right to vote. While some states had already passed laws granting partial or total suffrage to women, this amendment applied to every state. Alaska had already passed a women’s suffrage law back in 1913, earning praiseContinue reading “Voting Rights in Alaska”

Different Outbreaks but Familiar Threats for Alaskan Natives

IN 1912 the Assistant Surgeon General of Alaska, R.A. Kearney, wrote that “Unless some ways are used to check tuberculosis among the native Indians of Alaska the race will become extinct there in sixty or seventy years.” In 1918 the threat from Tuberculosis was still critical, indicated by a front page article in The CordovaContinue reading “Different Outbreaks but Familiar Threats for Alaskan Natives”

Measles Outbreaks in Alaska’s Historic Newspapers

Dear readers, It’s hard to avoid the alarming reports of measles outbreaks in the United States and worldwide. Vaccines have been proven to prevent the spread of measles; the MMR (measles- mumps-rubella) vaccine, which needs to be administered twice to children, has an effectiveness rate of 97%. Thanks to an effective vaccination program, the Centers forContinue reading “Measles Outbreaks in Alaska’s Historic Newspapers”

Native American History Month: Alaska Native Representation in Historic Newspapers

Please note: Photos in this post contain racist imagery and terms. “Alaska Native” can refer to members of several different tribes including Aleut, Athabascan, Alutiiq, Haida, Inupiat, Tlingit and Yup’ik, among many others: But too often in Historic Alaska newspapers, (primarily) white men and women represented Alaska Natives in ways that relied heavily on stereotypesContinue reading “Native American History Month: Alaska Native Representation in Historic Newspapers”