New Titles Online!

Although Covid has slowed down some of our work on the Alaska Digital Newspaper Project, it hasn’t stopped it! As part of our 2018-2020 cycle with the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities, we have uploaded over 35,000 pages to Chronicling America from the following newspapers: The New Native (Hydaburg, Alaska)Continue reading “New Titles Online!”

Contentious Confirmations

As the nation settles in for hearings on the nomination to the Supreme Court of Amy Coney Barrett, it is worth looking back at previous confirmation hearings from the 20th century. Today’s televised and heavily reported confirmation hearings bear little resemblance to those from a century ago – Prior to 1929 debate on Supreme CourtContinue reading “Contentious Confirmations”

Voting Rights in Alaska

Last month, this country marked the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which granted women across the nation the right to vote. While some states had already passed laws granting partial or total suffrage to women, this amendment applied to every state. Alaska had already passed a women’s suffrage law back in 1913, earning praiseContinue reading “Voting Rights in Alaska”

PTSD in World War One

World War One was the first war that fully made use of the developments and creations of the Industrial Age. Trench warfare, mass artillery barrages, and hopeless charges against fortified positions all contributed to a catastrophic death toll. When many soldiers in the war began demonstrating symptoms of panic, problems sleeping, and trouble talking orContinue reading “PTSD in World War One”

Different Outbreaks but Familiar Threats for Alaskan Natives

IN 1912 the Assistant Surgeon General of Alaska, R.A. Kearney, wrote that “Unless some ways are used to check tuberculosis among the native Indians of Alaska the race will become extinct there in sixty or seventy years.” In 1918 the threat from Tuberculosis was still critical, indicated by a front page article in The CordovaContinue reading “Different Outbreaks but Familiar Threats for Alaskan Natives”

A Look at the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska’s Historic Newspapers

June 26th is Canoe Day, a time when many of us head to a lake or a beach and soak up the sun during the afterglow of the Summer solstice. Recently, I paid a visit to one of my favorite places in Juneau, the iconic Mendenhall Glacier. This time, I kayaked across Lake Mendenhall toContinue reading “A Look at the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska’s Historic Newspapers”

Native American History Month: Alaska Native Representation in Historic Newspapers

Please note: Photos in this post contain racist imagery and terms. “Alaska Native” can refer to members of several different tribes including Aleut, Athabascan, Alutiiq, Haida, Inupiat, Tlingit and Yup’ik, among many others: But too often in Historic Alaska newspapers, (primarily) white men and women represented Alaska Natives in ways that relied heavily on stereotypesContinue reading “Native American History Month: Alaska Native Representation in Historic Newspapers”

Parts of a Newspaper: The Front Page

In this installment of the Parts of a Newspaper series, we’ll be looking at the part most central- the front page! Contributing to this post was city reporter for the Juneau Empire, Gregory Philson, who helped shed light on differences between century-old front pages to those of today. Below is a front page from theContinue reading “Parts of a Newspaper: The Front Page”

Parts of a Newspaper: Advertisements

Ads can tell us a lot about what is happening in a community during a particular time. Think about the ad you see in papers today – there are advertisements for goods, businesses, and services offered to name a few. So what can these tell us?